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Wolfram van Wezel
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With 10+ years of experience in the B2B technology arena, Wolfram van Wezel has earned a broad understanding of the software, hardware, IT consultancy, and printing markets. His client accounts
include HP, Cisco Systems, SAP, Microsoft, Nortel Networks, Alcatel, Avaya, Deloitte Consulting, Gartner, Novell, LANDesk, MRO Software, Progress Software, NextiraOne, JBoss, and GBC.

Prior to joining 3D2B in February 2004, Wolfram worked for an international B2B customer acquisition company in Germany, where he was responsible for the project management of top international accounts.

Today, as a Senior Project Consultant and Account Manager, Wolfram is responsible for all account implementation and management. In addition, he manages all quality and performance metrics for 3D2B client accounts.

Written by: Wolfram van Wezel

When business is doing well, it’s only natural to want to scale your sales force. It’s a seemingly simple formula. More sales reps equal more growth.

Written by: Wolfram van Wezel

When it comes to account-based marketing (ABM) today, data is the name of the game.

Admittedly, ABM is based on a time-tested, traditional sales strategy: identify and sell to prospects that match the needs and demographics of your best customers. An effective salesperson can easily target three to five significant accounts and build deep relationships without extensive data.

But to make ABM the centerpiece of your department’s sales efforts, you need to scale your process. And the key to scaling your ABM is your ability to manage your data, integrate with third-party data and identify the critical insights. 

Written by: Wolfram van Wezel

For marketers, account-based marketing (ABM) is the hottest thing since sliced bread. Its popularity is not surprising given the results it’s producing for many companies. SirusDecisions’ 2017 State of Account Based Marketing Studyreports that ABM “is fueling high performing b-to-b organizations; companies are realizing significant benefits including increased account engagement, better conversion to closed deals and higher average deal sizes.”

What’s So New about ABM?

ABM flips traditional lead-based marketing on its head. Instead of casting a wide net for leads and then filtering through them to determine which ones are good matches, you start with the sifting process. You look at the whole market, decide which accounts you want to bring into your fold and then go after them using a highly customized approach.

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Written by: Wolfram van Wezel

“Succeeding in business is all about making connections.” — Richard Branson

When you bake a chocolate cake, missing one ingredient can lead to disaster. Without baking powder, it goes flat. Without the sugar, it’s bitter. The same applies to the outreach tactics for account-based marketing. When you mix them together, they all work harder. I’ve previously written about two ingredients for successful account-based marketing — phone calls and personal emails. Today, let’s dig into the third — social media. How do you leverage social platforms the right way?

You have to approach social media outreach carefully because, contrary to some beliefs, it is not advertising. It’s more like an ongoing business networking event that you can attend at your convenience.

It’s helpful to think about business functions where you meet in person. Have you ever been to one where someone has approached you to sell you their product or service? How did you react? If you’re like most people, you probably excused yourself to make an emergency trip to the hors d’oeuvres table, ending the conversation as quickly as possible. 

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Written by: Wolfram van Wezel

As the account-based marketing (ABM) phenomenon gathers steam, sales and marketing professionals need to add the human touch to their communications. After all, ABM is all about communicating with individual prospects or accounts as a market. Last time, I wrote about how to craft outbound calls for ABM. Now, let’s move on to emails.

Because executives are deluged with emails that clamor for their attention, communicating via email marketing to large groups is no longer as effective as it was in the past. To cut through the clutter and get attention, emails must be personal and relevant. These emails must feel like they are written by one person to another. There’s no need for fancy designs and images that involve HTML code because plain text is as personal as it gets. 

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The bane of every sales person’s existence is running into an impasse with a potential customer when they throw an objection in the way. To overcome these hurdles, reps must understand the common framework for diffusing objections and be prepared with well thought out answers to those that your company commonly receives.

The Framework for Diffusing Objections

Let’s suppose your rep has finally connected with a sought after prospect. They’re just seconds into the call when the prospect says, “I already do business with ABC Solutions and love their service, I don’t see a need to look for anyone else.”

That seems like a rather large stumbling block. Nevertheless, it’s not the time to hang up the phone. Here are the steps to take:

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Account-based marketing is becoming a go-to strategy for B2B marketers who want to take control of their outreach (rather than waiting to see who finds them) and shorten their sales cycles. What may be receiving less acclaim, however, is the starring role outbound calls play in executing account-based marketing strategies.

If you’ve done your research correctly and know who to contact, when you make an outbound call, there are two possible results. One, you connect with a decision maker. Two, you end up in voicemail. You need a plan to make the most out of either situation.

Here’s how to craft your message for live calls and voicemails. 

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Written by: Wolfram van Wezel

We hear so much these days about the customer-driven buyer’s journey and that more than half of the sales cycle occurs without prospective customers contacting a sales representative. The new buyer’s journey puts ever-increasing pressure on marketing departments to handle the pre-sales process.

Although marketing technology, with its lead scoring, data integration, and automated content delivery tools, can help marketers respond quickly to inquiries online and deliver targeted content, it’s often not enough. That’s why the best marketers still match high tech with the human touch—especially when their product line is complex, and the sales cycle is long.

It’s not enough to capture a lead, follow up, pass the lead to sales, and hope for the business. You need to turn requests into qualified leads and ideally sales-enabled leads. Marketing’s job is to get salespeople in front of prospective customers. And one of the best ways to do that is to work with a professional telemarketing service that specializes in B2B sales and develop a proven appointment-setting strategy. 

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What’s Causing the B2B Inside Sales Training Problem?

Last September, the AA-ISP, an international association dedicated exclusively to advancing the profession of Inside Sales, released their 2014 Inside Sales Top Challenges. And they discovered that the number one challenge sales leaders are facing today is training inside sales people to perform well. In fact, many sales organizations complain about a high turnover of inside sales representatives as they don’t manage to bring them to the performance levels they expect in the calculated timeframes. 

Why is training such a hot issue?

A 2013 study by InsideSales.com reports inside sales is growing 300% faster than field sales. This trend is expected to continue. That’s because inside sales:

·         cuts costs

·         is accepted by customers who have become comfortable learning about companies remotely via websites, social media, content downloads such as e-books and white papers, email and phone calls

In fact, many customers prefer the flexibility of phone calls to face-to-face meetings.

Due to the benefits of inside sales, the B2B sales model is changing. Inside sales representatives are taking over more sales duties, sometimes handling the complete sale by themselves rather than working hand in hand with a field sales person. Even if they are working with a field sales executive, they may be doing more up front to transform leads into qualified sales opportunities before passing the baton to the field sales person.

The growth in demand for inside sales people has resulted in a shortage of qualified reps on the market. That means companies now need to hire and train people who may not have a proven track record in inside sales.

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Success is where preparation and opportunity meet,” said Bobby Unser, who is one of the ten drivers to win the Indianapolis 500 three or more times.

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